10 FUNCTIONAL TESTS OFFERED BY DR. FISEL

Are you experiencing health symptoms that have left you feeling less than stellar?

You have tried everything you can think of to address your symptoms:

  • Practiced an over-the-counter medication or supplement regimen
  • Consulted with and obtained an allopathic doctor’s perspective
  • Made lifestyle adjustments related to nutrition, movement, sleep and stress management habits

After all of this, are you still struggling with your symptoms despite the fact that your tests have come back “normal”?

One important aspect of naturopathic medicine is the principle of “doctor as educator.” It is the cornerstone of naturopathic care. Naturopathic physicians teach their patients how to make conscious lifestyle choices, giving them the confidence they need to reach and maintain an optimal state of health.

As such, I want to help you get to the root of your symptoms. Following are ten additional lab tests – you might not have known about or considered – that we often utilize at our office. These tests can help you get a more complete picture of your health and also help you discern how your habits and symptoms are contributing to your overall wellness.

10 FUNCTIONAL TESTS OFFERED BY DR. MATTHEW FISEL ND:

  1. Cardiovascular – Testing done to screen for independent cardiovascular risk factors, such as hs-CRP, fibrinogen, and Lipoprotein(a). This test can give you a much more detailed assessment of your heart disease risk than just measuring cholesterol levels.
  2. Hormone – Detailed female hormone testing, including the DUTCH test, for women who are struggling with hormonal issues, and want more options than just a prescription for oral contraceptives.
  3. Glandular – Comprehensive adrenal and thyroid hormone testing, especially helpful for when you’re taking prescription thyroid medication, but still feel symptomatic.
  4. Environmental Toxicity – Heavy Metal testing, which can help to detect lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, and other metals that have been linked to various neurological and autoimmune diseases.
  5. Environmental Allergens – Mycotoxin testing, to identify mold toxicity that doesn’t otherwise show up with typical allergy testing.
  6. Gut Microbiome – Comprehensive stool testing, like the GI Map or GI Effects Profile, which look at a number of factors that can have a negative impact on your digestive health, including parasites, bacterial infections, candida, and inflammatory markers, as well as looking at your healthy microbiome.
  7. Digestion – SIBO breath testing, particularly helpful for patients who have been diagnosed with IBS, or are experiencing persistent bloating that doesn’t seem to resolve with any treatments.
  8. Nutrition – Food sensitivity testing, which can help to identify foods that may be contributing to both digestive and system wide symptoms. 
  9. Metabolic – Genetic SNPs, such as MTHFR and COMT, which can identify predispositions to metabolic problems that may make you more prone to depression, anxiety, fatigue, and a number of other symptoms.
  10. Comprehensive Nutritional Testing – helps to help identify optimal levels of vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and amino acids. Most conventional testing is only looking to identify blatant deficiencies, but doesn’t take optimal ranges into account. 

Navigating the information available to you in terms of your health and wellness can be a daunting task. I work to support your wellness by utilizing all perspectives. If after exploring your health options, you are left with the feeling – THERE MUST BE SOMETHING MORE I CAN DO –let’s talk about the different tests I offer in my office and determine a course of action you might not have already considered.

If you live in the Guilford/ Branford/ New Haven/ Madison/ Clinton area and would like to learn more about integrative solutions for your health care needs, I can help you get to the root of your symptoms by promoting health and healing on all levels – physically, emotionally and spiritually.

Call (203) 453-0122 or CLICK HERE to schedule a consultation.

Testosterone Lowers Male Heart Disease Risk

In the last couple of years, studies looking at the correlation between testosterone levels and heart disease in men have yielded mixed results. However, if you look more closely at the data, most of the reports showing negative associations with testosterone failed to factor in other independent risk factors that can lead to heart disease. The negative studies also used inaccurate laboratory methods and reference ranges to reach their conclusions, inflating the risks of testosterone. [Read more…]

Don’t Skip Your Breakfast!

Prior research suggests that breakfast eaters may be healthier than people who skip breakfast, and now a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests a nutritious breakfast may be especially good for your heart. Specifically, the recent study shows that regular breakfast eaters may reduce risk factors linked to heart disease.

Breakfast eaters reduce heart disease risk factors

While prior research has shown that skipping breakfast may lower a person’s energy level and increase the risk of weight gain, less is known about the effects of skipping breakfast on other body organs and functions.

In this study, 2,184 participants, 9 to 15 years old, initially filled out a questionnaire about diet and physical activity and stated whether they usually ate breakfast before school or not. Twenty years later, one third of the original participants filled out a meal frequency questionnaire, had their waist size measured, and had blood levels of triglycerides, total and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and fasting insulin (insulin levels after no food has been eaten overnight) checked. Participants were then classified into four groups:

• skipped breakfast in neither childhood nor adulthood,

• skipped breakfast only in childhood,

• skipped breakfast only in adulthood, or

• skipped breakfast in both childhood and adulthood.

Results showed that people who skipped breakfast in both childhood and adulthood had a larger waist size and total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels compared with people who ate breakfast in both childhood and adulthood. They also had higher fasting insulin levels, which indicates they have insulin resistance, a risk factor for diabetes and heart disease.

Breakfast skippers also tended to be single, have a lower education level, and were more likely to smoke, watch TV, get less physical activity, and have a less healthy diet compared with breakfast eaters.

The authors comment, “Skipping breakfast was associated with a larger waist circumference, cardiometabolic risk factors, poorer diet quality, and unhealthy lifestyle behaviors.” They add that promoting the benefits of eating breakfast may be an important public health message.

M
ore reasons to be a breakfast eater

There are many good reasons to eat breakfast, and prior research has shown that compared with breakfast skippers, breakfast eaters tend to have:

Better habits. People who eat breakfast tend to have healthier diets and get more physical activity.

A more nutritious diet. Breakfast eaters tend to eat less daily fat and cholesterol and more fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

A healthier weight. Some studies suggest that breakfast eaters have a lower weight compared with breakfast skippers.

Artificial Sweeteners=Real Trouble

Most of my patients know that I’m not a fan of artificial sweeteners, but people often have      a hard time cutting them out of their diet. Hopefully this evidence (excerpted from   mercola.com) will be enough of a motivator!

Why Artificial Sweeteners Can be Detrimental to Your Waistline

The belief that eating artificially sweetened foods and drinking artificially sweetened beverages will help you to lose weight is a carefully orchestrated deception. So if you are still opting for sugar-free choices for this reason, you are being sorely misled.

For years now studies have shown that consuming artificial sweeteners breaks the connection between a sweet sensation and a high-calorie food, thereby changing your body’s ability to regulate intake naturally.

In one study by psychologists at Purdue University’s Ingestive Behavior Research Center, rats that ate yogurt sweetened with an artificial sweetener consumed more calories (and didn’t make up for it by cutting back later), gained more weight, and put on more body fat than rats that ate yogurt sweetened with sugar.

Other studies, too, have shown that eating artificial sweeteners might hinder your body’s ability to estimate calorie intake, thus boosting your inclination to overindulge. Your body and your brain simply do not have the same biological response to artificial sweeteners that they do to regular sugar, and this can pose some serious problems.

Your Brain Can Tell the Difference

You may have convinced yourself that your favorite artificial sweetener tastes the same as sugar, but rest assured your brain is not being fooled.

In one brain-scan study by neuroscientist Paul Smeets, volunteers were given two version of a beverage, one sweetened with sugar, the other with a blend of artificial sweeteners. The brain scans showed that the artificially sweetened beverage failed to activate an area of the brain called the caudate nucleus, which is an area associated with rewards.

A separate study by psychiatrist Guido Frank at the University of Colorado in Denver also looked into your brain’s response to sugar versus artificial sweeteners. Women given a taste of the two said they could not consciously determine a difference. However, a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of their brain responses showed differences indeed.

As in the previously mentioned study, the sugar activated the reward areas of your brain more strongly than the artificial sweetener, suggesting that the latter may not make you feel satisfied the way sugar would.

This is not an endorsement to indulge in sugar; rather it’s a major clue that your body is not being fooled by artificial sweeteners.

Blueberries and Insulin

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition (August 19, 2010) showed that subjects who consumed blueberries twice/day for 6 weeks had an improvement in insulin sensitivity. The participants were all obese and insulin-resistant, but not diabetic.

Blueberries have long been considered a “super-food” because of their high antioxidant and fiber content, and are often recommended for diabetic or insulin-resistant patients due to their negligible affect on blood sugar (as opposed to other fruits). However, the fact that they are now proven to actually reverse insulin-resistance makes it even more important for doctors to emphasize that all patients who are pre-diabetic and/or obese consume blueberries on a daily basis.